Sports

Commentary: Is it that hard to find a kind, decent boss?

A LOUSY BOSS COSTS A LOT

So why does the idea of the awful boss still persist? I suspect it is because their impact is so toxic.

Famously, half of employees say they have left a job to escape a manager at some point, Gallup data has shown.

The idea of a lousy boss is even more dire in the midst of a global pandemic, which doubtless explains part of the Lasso appeal.

This has not gone unnoticed. In the UK, 45 per cent of workers think their organisation is more empathetic towards staff than it was before the pandemic, a survey showed last week, and 35 per cent say they now have more emotional support at work.

I hope this lasts. One of my lockdown discoveries was the audiobook, which is where I heard Stephen Fry say something about another specialist in geniality, PG Wodehouse, that I doubt I would have linked with working life so readily pre-pandemic.

In an introduction to one Wodehouse volume, Fry says the writer had been a tremendous influence.

“He taught me something about good nature: it is enough to be benign, to be gentle, to be funny, to be kind.”

This is a great lesson of Ted Lasso and, as the past 18 months have shown, one it is wise to heed in real life well.

Commentary: Is it that hard to find a kind, decent boss? Source link Commentary: Is it that hard to find a kind, decent boss?

Back to top button